Category Archives: green spaces

Going wild on your way to work

If you travel by train or bus to work its a great time to check out the nature on your journey.

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Bus stops can be surprisingly good places for nature

My commute from Bath to Swindon by train transports me through glorious countryside. Just staring out of the window is a nice way to get to know the green places around where you live or work. I’m lucky that its field after field and I might be able to spot a roaming deer or flock of rooks in the trees. Its a view that I never really tire of.

Even the most urban commute by train will throw up all kinds of wild treats. Its a question of looking. Railways can create great corridors for wildlife and the embankments can be full of life with butterflies settling on buddleia and songbirds perching in the trees. Wildflowers also spring up adding a splash of colour and the brambles and nettles are great as a wonderful food source for all sorts of creatures.

Waiting at a bus stop as you’re just waking up might not seem the best place to do some wildlife watching. You’d be surprised if you did some detective work while you wait as plants and birds particularly can spring up where you least expect them. Insects can also be found making their way from A to B, whether spiders of beetles.

So, 30 Days Wild is a great time to think about using your journey to work as a new found window on the world of wildlife.

Bluebell heaven

I’m stood in the middle of a bluebell wood.  All around me is a carpet of blue. This is the most astonishing display of these much loved spring-time plants that I have ever seen. I feel like I need to rub my eyes to make sure that this is real and not some daydream. The only word that comes into my head is ‘wow’.

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I look around and as far as the eye can see is bluebells. The overcast nature of the day and the lush green of the emerging leaves amplifies the colour. I’ve seen countless images of bluebell woods: it’s a staple of photo stories in the nationals and social media channels such as Instagram  in late April and early May. But I have never seen anything to compare with this. The stresses of the day begin to ebb away the longer I stand in the woods, showing the power of nature to add a real calmness to our daily lives. We all need our patch of natural heaven to refresh us.

This magical Bluebell wood is called Hagbourne Copse. It’s carefully managed by Wiltshire Wildlife Trust. For years I have passed this place on the way to and from work in Swindon. Finally after years of anticipation I made it into the woods. But this first visit exceeded any expectations that I had and I hadn’t fully anticipated the natural treat that was in store for me.

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The most remarkable thing about this Bluebell wood is its location. This woodland, roughly the size of a few football pitches, is surrounded by roads and an industrial estate. Its minutes away from Junction 16 on the M4 and is next to the main route, used by tens of thousands of people every day, on their way to and from work in Swindon.

It seems remarkable to think that so many people will pass this special place every day totally oblivious to its beauty.  Many people have written about the so-called edgelands: marginal and often non-descript places on the edge of our towns and cities. These are places where nature moves in when people move out; or places where nature gradually takes over the forgotten strips of land or abandoned brownfield sites.

Hagbourne Copse is a classic example of the need for us all to look closer to home for nature. It can be found in the most surprising places. Near to where I work in Swindon is a footpath that negotiates it’s way between the railway and a car-park: and yet this short green corridor is awash with natural treats.

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Little did I think that my favourite ever Bluebell wood would be in a place like this. For me it shows the ability of nature to thrive where-ever it’s found. This copse will have been here long before the warehouses, car showrooms and hotels. It’s a place that transports us deep into the heart of nature and connects us to why wildlife has the ability to provide a sense of awe that few other things can compete with.

Park life

I’m sat in a park, well more of a square, in central Leeds, on the hottest day of the year. Its full of life…people chatting, reading books or just chilling, kids play with the sent of roses filling the air. This small green space in the centre of one of the great northern cities shows why parks matter: it’s a place where you get a real sense of community.
It might be a well worn phrase but parks are our green lungs. We have the Victorians to thanks for the rise of public parks. They quickly became hugely popular as places to promenade and get away, on high days and holidays, from the intensity of a six day week.
Personally I can’t imagine a world with out parks. For me they are great democratic spaces where the full spectrum of life gathers regardless of income or status. In urban Britain with its squished in houses they matter for countless millions. People spill out into parks during the working week to get some green space time.
A weekend in our family rarely goes by without a trip to our local park. Children really value them as places to roam free and meet new friends. The concept of the park is so simple and yet is under threat.
Cuts to Local Authority budgets means that in the cold light of squeezed finances it is becoming a case of park life vs social services. As park budgets shrink we are in danger of being the generation that oversaw the end of parks as we know them.
Parks are so much more than a green space and we need to defend the important role that they play as glue bringing communities together. They are places to meet, places to dream, places to switch off and places to play. We need to stand up for parks before its too late and look at ways of keeping them open for everyone.

Time for a great British meadow revival

If you were a time lord and could travel back in time to say the 1950s the British countryside would be awash with a mosaic of meadows. They were a staple of the farming system which was full of wild life.

In the last six decades things have changed pretty drastically. Haymeadows have declined by around 90%; a common yet sad stat for many of our fragile habitats. The green revolution in farming (ie more intensive farming) and other changes in land use created the perfect conditions for a slow long decline.

And yet it doesn’t have to be this way. There is a gradual, very British, revolution taking place. Conservation organisations like the National Trust, Plantlife and the Wildlife Trusts (supported by lottery funding and public support), are at the forefront of introducing a change in the way that land is managed to re-introduce haymeadows. They clearly see the value of a habitat that creates a place for wildflowers and insects to flourish.

Visiting a haymeadow in the summer when its just about to peak is a wonderful experience. The plethora of grasses gently sway in the summer breeze, wildflowers add a splash of colour like a Monet painting and butterflies bask in the sunshine. Its one of those experiences that just captivates you.

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A local meadow in Bath, helping to create rich habitats for local wildlife

This slow change in the way that we see the land has also arrived in our towns and cities. At a time of challenging budgets for local authorities creating a network of meadows makes financial sense and enriches the local green spaces. In Bath over the last couple of years mini-meadow projects have been popping up across the city.

These wild places are great for people living in urban areas to reconnect with the natural world. Often small patches of green, they add a vibrancy, and a sense of why nature is so important as a tonic for our busy screen based lives.

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At Bath City Farm, thanks to funding from Natural England, a haymeadow is being re-created on a steep sided hill. When you wander around the nature trail, you will in June, come across a field full of buttercups and with this new meadow project the diversity of flowers will only grow.

Meadows can have a slightly romantic feel to them; those sun-kissed days full of dappled light and the lush warm colours. And yet they provide a really important place for nature to call home. Its time that the Great British Meadow revival really took hold so that they once again become a common sight across our wonderful landscapes.

Corridors of wild power

When we think of places where we connect with nature our minds often turn to open fields, deep forests, mountain ranges or the rugged coastline.  Its a natural instinct in-built through thousands of years of tending the land that we associate nature with rural places. After all our diet of wildlife telly beamed into our living rooms or devoured on smartphones has a particular countryside bias.

And yet for most of us its the everyday experience of urban living where we can potentially connect with the natural world. However, in our busy, fast-paced and hard-pressed lives, we often miss the obvious signs of wildlife right in front of our eyes or beneath our feet.

The nature of our towns and cities means that wild oases can be found in the most unusual places. You just need the time and patience to look in the right places.

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Not far from where I work in Swindon there is a lane sandwiched between the mainline railway and an office car park. Its no more than a few hundred metres long and about 5-10 metres wide; and connects one of the station car parks and path into the centre of town. In reality its one of those non-descript places that people pass through in a hurry, either on their way to work or heading home.

This slightly unloved grey/green corridor, however, is full of wild life. Stroll along the footpath on a sunny day and the noise of the trains and hum of urban life drains away as the birds sing in full throttle, the bees buzz past in a real hurry and butterflies rest on nettles to soak up the sun.

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Over the last few weeks the foilage of the trees and hedgerows has come alive with hawthorn bursting into brilliant white and the mini meadows filling up with buttercups, dandelions and forget-me-nots. Blackbirds and robins have been getting busy building nests for the breeding season and the lane has come alive with cabbage white and orange tip butterflies.

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Throughout the rest of Spring and into Summer this will become a place where I go to get my fix of nature, to daydream and let the troubles of the world disappear.

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For me its these edgelands, these arteries of urban life, that can re-awaken people’s interest in nature. We can all find them near to where we work or live. Just take the time in a lunch break or on the way to home to linger and tune into the intensity of nature or just watch as insects fly this way and that.  It doesn’t matter whether you can identify the species you see; the act of just connecting with the wild place where you live will enrich your life.

Less mowing, more meadows

There is a bank of grass behind where I live. It’s a place that I pass regularly, coming home from work or taking the kids up to a local park. In the spring daffodils light up the grassy hill and then we have the perfect almost feathery orb-shaped dandelions. It’s a place that the kids like to run free.

A grassy bank which has been left to grow that little bit wilder; creating a great home for nature

A grassy bank which has been left to grow that little bit wilder; creating a great home for nature

Normally this area of green is mowed once the daffodils have finished. But now there is a move to keep some of these sorts of spaces – every day but vitally important spaces – a little bit wilder and less manicured. Leaving patches of green where the grasses can grow longer. It means that nature can live a little bit more, less bothered by the arrival of lawn mowers and it helps to create a sense of wildness in our towns and cities.

It’s been really encouraging to see my local council – Bath and North East Somerset – with its ‘wild meadows’ project take an enlightened approach to managing these important green spaces. And credit also to Plantlife for all of there hard work to get meadows and wild plants on the agenda in such a positive way.

Yes there is a need to think about the ascetics of our green spaces but the well documented decline in species and loss of habitats means that urban areas are becoming increasingly important in efforts to stem this loss.

Roundabouts full of wild flowers adding a splash of colour to the daily commute or allowing grasses and plants to grow a little bit wilder is good news in my book. Life would be that much more boring if everything and every-where looked the same.

And as our towns and cities have expanded over the centuries they have gobbled up the countryside. So it feels right and refreshing for local authorities to re-create a sense of the naturalness of the countryside and creating homes for bumblebees, crickets, daisies and grasses and meadow brown butterflies among other species. I’ll often see bats in the autumn at dusk grazing on the bounty of insects on the wing.

Walking home after a hard day staring at my screen at work seeing the slightly chaotic and almost carefree areas on this grassy bank lifts the spirits.

When the sun streams through the leaf-laden trees it shows how we can through simple and important cost-effective solutions create a network of mini nature reserves that come alive on warm spring or summer days.

These places can become little oases in the landscape of housing and roads, helping our well-being and connecting us to nature.